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On Barbara Ehrenreich’s Bait and Switch

Bait and Switch : The (Futile) Pursuit of the American DreamBait and Switch : The (Futile) Pursuit of the American Dream by Barbara Ehrenreich
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

This is another book to add to the mountain of evidence that my homelessness is absolutely and entirely the fault of others. I graduated from college in 1999 and earned my master’s in 2005. Ehrenreich began this book in 2001 and published in in 2005. Every single person she profiled in the book was older at the time than I am now (38) and had higher salaries than I’ve ever earned ($50-60,000 range–the only time I got even close to the equivalent hourly rate my hours were in the single digits), and every single one of them ended up either doing a low-to-minimum wage job that I can’t do (I am medically limited to a desk job on account of scoliosis that went undiagnosed until 2005 when I was 29, L4-L5-S1 herniated discs, neurogenic bladder, sciatica in both legs, and plantar fasciitis in both feet, and have difficulty standing for more than very short periods, and use a cane if I expect to stand for more than an hour, and spasms that make the cane absolutely necessary–Social Security says someone with my age, education, and experience is not disabled by their standards because I can work a desk job, and Binder and Binder was no help, saying that the only way they could help me get SSD is if I got a doctor to write a note explaining why I can’t do a desk job, either, which isn’t true) or they have moved back in with their parents–my father passed away. As of September 2014, I have been homeless for 28 months after I was betrayed by a graduate school colleague who had me relocate for an $18,000 probationary salary and then let me go after three months, knowing at the time that he hired me I had been in housing court because I had lost the entirety of my savings to rent as I unsuccessfully searched for jobs that have seemingly all been exported to his native India.

Some of the critics of this book assert that Ehrenreich used false credentials that undermine her hirability, and while that is true (although her actual credentials are certainly the transferable skills they tell us are so important), she never really even got to the interview phase, and that doesn’t say anything in regard to the other people she met and discussed along the way. Another critic on here attacked her for complaining about religion at the faith-based groups. She mostly restricted this to those that were religious but did not explicitly advertise themselves as such (one used the word “fellowship” as the only clue for an event in the banquet hall of a Shoney’s, and proved itself to be racist and anti-Semitic as well as religious (128-131), although she does criticize the way the majority of them send extremely contradictory messages.

I did find it laughable when she said the number of applications that she’d done being over a hundred. I have been tracking my job applications in an Excel file since the month prior to losing my job and becoming homeless. As of yesterday’s applications, I am on line 2,799. I have had 24 interviews in that time, ten of which were with staffing services, and many of the others were scams that had me wanting to bolt to the door but waiting for a socially acceptable moment without agreeing to anything.

Like Ehrenreich, at the time I was in housing court, I was presented with the AFLAC scam (train to work at AFLAC entirely at your own expense and working from your home office) at a similarly-decorated office in the Bronx. State Farm has been trying the same thing lately, as has Liberty Tax Service.

As someone without Ehrenreich’s money, but whose experience and ability is entirely in white collar work, I have experienced a lot of what she describes in this book, much of it foisted on me by the Department of Labor while I was on unemployment or various government subcontractors such as FEGS, Arbor WeCare, Project Renewal, etc. On my own, I went to a Career Clout meetup group (which is also an advertising ploy, hammered home when I attended a second meeting), which obviously had impact on her, because she mentions the career coach having her develop PAR (“problem/action/response”) statements (92). This system was developed by a guy named Lloyd Feinstein (sounds too much like Lloyd Blankfein for my liking) and stands for problem/action/response. The Career Clout style is intended to gear your resume toward hiring managers and to go above the heads of HR, but 99% of people don’t have the clout to reach over the heads of HR straight to the hiring manager. Even addressing the hiring manager by name in the cover letter is ineffective. I was doing that in every cover letter during my first year of homelessness (2012), and I got shot down a lot, not to mention all the people who kept telling me that the PAR setup is too negative to work, in spite of Career Clout’s very logical assertion that the employer hires people to solve problems.

The first part of the book deals with Barbara Alexander’s (she went job searching under her maiden name) dealings with three embarrassing career coaches, the incredibly upbeat and vapid Kimberly who is obsessed with MBTI, the validity of which Ehrenreich does an excellent job at skewering as no more valid than astrology (32-34, 227) via Annie Murphy Paul‘s The Cult of Personality: How Personality Tests Are Leading Us to Miseducate Our Children Mismanage Our Companies and Misunderstand Ourselves; Morton who uses Enneagrams very bad Wizard of Oz analogies (and I write this review as the L. Frank Baum (not that the MGM Wizard of Oz movie that is best known to the general public is anywhere close to Baum’s vision and themes) expert that Ehrenreich professes that she is not, and an allusion to the origin of the Tin Woodman on page 19 seems to epitomize one of the themes taken up in the book. Often, Nick Chopper would say that he was “careless” in having cut himself apart, knowing full well at the time of the telling that his ax was under a spell)), and Joanne, who seems relatively reasonable (who is more a resume expert than a job developer, but says lying that lying on the resume is par for the course, but is in fact someone just trying to eke a living after her husband got–you guessed it–downsized.

Eventually she makes her way to the self-proclaimed inventor of Career Coaching, Patrick Knowles, and her portrayal of him as a pathetic failure is even more palpable than Patrick Swayze’s performance as the mad and pedophilic guru Jim Cunningham in Richard Kelly’s Donnie Darko. Knowles’s behavior with Cynthia, while not pedophilic, is almost as disturbing (78). This is probably the best part of the book, and where Ehrenreich displays incredible gifts as a writer, more than her uses of words that I, an English major (Ehrenreich states that hers was chemistry), had to look up in the dictionary — “moue” (114) and “koan” (153). She then follows another bit of advice that I have never been able to do successfully, and at which Barbara Alexander also failed–turning the tables on someone and making their meeting with you into an episode in which you aggressively prove to them that they need your services. I have never heard of this sort of aggression working in real life actually working, and the Guerrilla Marketing gurus that keep e-mailing me can provide only one definitive example–a guy who worked on a construction site uninvited. Given my physical condition, were I to try this, all it would do is result in a lot of insurance headaches for the employer I had chosen as my victim. I asked for white collar examples of something like this (I’ve heard the story more than once, and believe it is probably apocryphal), and so far, none have been forthcoming. In 2013, I alerted Marvel Comics that the previous year I had applied to an assistant editor position for which proofreading was a major component of the job, but that an early issue of Morbius, the Living Vampire (a title on which I would have loved to have worked, though it was canceled after only nine issues) that somehow “bare with me” had made it into the dialogue, which makes no sense in a scene between two straight men. It was in a word balloon and not a message, so the error can’t be attributed to a character. This didn’t get any more of a response than my three attempts to get permission to move forward with my opera based on The Man-Thing, which thus far exists only in sheet music notebooks until I can find singers unafraid to sing texts that are, legally speaking, plagiarized, albeit with credit. She likens the career coaching field to Eric Fromm’s novel, Escape from Freedom, “which as an attempt to understand the appeal of fascism” (89).

Her assault on networking is merciless:

Why, when job searching could be totally rationalized by the Internet through a simple matching of job seeker’s skills to company needs, does everything seem to depend on this old-fashioned, face-to-face networking? After all, there’s going to be an interview anyway, right?

“It’s about trust,” Ron answers opaquely, not to mention “likability.” “The higher up you get in the executive ranks the more things depend on being likable. You’ve got to fit in.”

…It’s distracting to think that our major economic enterprises, on which the livelihoods and well-being of millions depend, rest so heavily on the thin goo of “likability.”

Getting up in the executive ranks as a result of “likability” is our society in self destruct mode, since, as Cathy O’Neill points out, that’s what got Tim Geithner into position to destroy the global economy to begin with. And Ehreinreich even has Jim Lukaszewski admit on page 159, that CEOs are out of touch, isolated, and “idle,” that is, lazy. The highest-paid people in white collar employment are the laziest. Those of us scrambling unsuccessfully to find employment are dubbed lazy by our now-Orwellian society, while those on the right, who do the most name calling, love CEOs and generally refuse to admit that they do little or no actual work.

The Gap gets capitalized both when she mentions her clothing from said store and when dealing with what she finds to be insurmountable in terms of the resume. I’ve covered mine by describing myself as a freelancer with clients (all real, unlike Ehrenreich’s), to no avail. She discusses invisibility and futility (171) in spite of her ENTJ MBTI result (mine is INTJ, which is supposedly only 1% of the population, which ought to make me extremely desirable as an employee, except that the “diversity” that employers claim that they want is illusory, as Ehrenreich details on page 229), which went from being desirable to “like all those fairy-tale characters who are unfortunate to get what they wished for from an overly literal-minded wish granter” (my favorite example of this is the DC horror story in which a guy gives his soul to Satan for a copy of every comic book ever published and a house big enough to hold them all, only to be suffocated by the delivery down the chimney of every comic book ever published throughout the entire universe). One guy tries to hobnob at the Capital Grille (spelled Capitol Grill), an upscale restaurant, as a waiter, also unsuccessfully (172). I went into one of these places with Monica Hunken and others on September 17, 2012, singing about getting money out of politics and was forced to leave by the staff. The New York Times shows that this businesses is doing extremely well because it caters to the wealthy, while businesses that cater to the middle class are failing.

Then she gets into the complete uselessness of job fairs, which are strictly for sales jobs (198). No matter what industry they claim to be about, it’s always for sales within that industry. Nobody believes me when I tell them this, but here it is in a published book. I hate sales and have never been successful at it, even with things I believe in, like my own works of fiction and drama. I went to one for media jobs, and it was mostly door-to-door sales trying to get people to change their cable company. A 58-year-old out-of-work machinist who was one of my roommates in my previous shelter went to one of these job fairs, told me it was all sales, and said that the line was wrapped entirely around the block such that they kept it open long past the 3 PM stated ending time to be fair to everyone that arrived, though no employer was really equipped to recruit more than twenty people, and, as with every job fair I’ve attended, they tell you to apply through the website. They say that they’ll flag it because they met you, but given the number of applications these jobs get, I seriously doubt if that is true, nor did any of them actually respond when I applied, even the ones who gave me their e-mail address and told me to write to them when I had finished the online application.

The conclusion of the book, in which she talks about the people she met along the way in jobs standing all day at Home Depot or in heavily physical blue collar jobs for which no intelligent employer would hire me as an insurance liability (204-211), has Ehrenreich looking forward to the Occupy movement and its revolt against capitalism that was forced underground and declared dead by the right-wing controlled media. The messages she receives throughout the book are contradictory, and she ties these bits together (221). The abusiveness of a Patrick Knowles, with his EST-like (her comparison) method of blaming the victim (this portion really rang home with me–I am “Bill” in David Friedman‘s The Thought Exchange–David has been through EST, and it seems to be a definite influence on his continued teachings), who blames the victim with the circular reasoning that because “you” are the common denominator in everything that happens to you, it must therefore be “your” fault, a logic that they would conveniently ignore if someone as physically bullying as they are psychologically were to punch them in the face and insist it was their own fault. A friend who wants to get on Dr. Phil to expose the abusive nature of her family suggested that I do the same, but from what I know of Dr. Phil, it’s easy to construct a fantasy in which h tells me I’m the only one to blame for my circumstances, hitting him, then as I’m dragged off by security or the police, telling him how it’s entirely his fault he got punched and his hypocrisy at having me removed. Ehrenreich expresses a similar fantasy about “pummeling” Mike Hernacki, Bruce I. Doyle, and Patrick Knowles (85). This she contrasts with the churches’ more positive methods about alliance with God (Ehrenreich states her atheism (134); I have been in the Unity church since age 4, and both Unity and the Thought Exchange have been called “Buddhism for westerners,” and the term “metaphysical malpractice” is often used when EST-like blame is distributed by Unity congregants, especially among those who are new, or pick and choose scraps from various metaphysical sources, such as Rhonda Byrne. My minister, Paul Tenaglia, thought Nickel and Dimed was brilliant but decried Bright-Sided, which appeared four years after this and seems like it may have been inspired by Barbara Alexander’s experiences with Kimberly. She describes both, ultimately, as fantasies of omnipotence that insidiously, if not deliberately, work to prevent people from confronting the social and economic forces shaping their lives.

Ehrenreich reaches the conclusion that I, as an Occupier, reached early on in the book, the need for collective action against the system (237), even citing Marx on the instability of capitalism on page 217, after an earlier reference to Marxism on page 162. “When skilled and experienced people routinely find their skills unwanted and their experience discounted,” Ehrenreich says, “then something has happened that cuts deep into the very social contract that holds us together.” Indeed, if you notice my 2014 reading challenge, you’ll see a lot of collected editions of Golden Age comic books. The notions of democracy reflected in these bitterly anti-fascist tracts makes me as a contemporary reader incredibly cynical of how much our society has taken a turn for the worse. Right-wingers point out that the United States is not a democracy, but a Representative Republic. More accurately, it is a Non-Representative Republic based in corporatism, which Mussolini said was the same as fascism. On page 223, Ehrenreich notes that “the job-generating function ranked higher among corporate imperatives. CEOs were more likely to stand up to the board of directors and insist on retaining employees rather than boosting dividends in the short-term by laying people off. She even cites Claire Giannini, the daughter of the founder of Bank of America, saying that in her father’s day, executives took pay cuts to avoid laying off staff. I’ve heard only of non-profits like my church doing such things. In 1960s comics, many a villain (such as Calvin Zabo/Mr. Hyde and Klaus Vorhees/The Cobra in Stan Lee‘s Thor) gets started because they are offered a plum job that they don’t deserve. Usually their employer has doubts but thinks that they can afford to be generous, and it usually results in their deaths. This sort of thing happens metaphorically every day with the Geithners of the world, but I find it astonishing how easily these overtly unqualified people get white collar jobs walking in off the street and wonder if it was equally implausible when the stories were first published. I’ve never been able to get past security with my resume, and when I was still living at home after college, my mother demanded that I use a literal pavement-pounding technique, and when it failed after weeks and weeks, it led to her aggression against me that made living with her not an option in either of our opinions. She could stand to read about these 45 year-olds in 2005 being forced to move back in with their parents. The economy hasn’t improved any since then. It’s been whitewashed with the numbers game, but the alternative media that is actually progressive has noted that all growth has been in minimum wage service sector jobs on an income that is not livable in even the poorest parts of Mississippi. I heartily endorse Ehrenreich’s conclusion, conservatively presented (“work for change”) as it is. I work with Occupy Wall Street Alternative Banking, Occu-Evolve, Picture the Homeless, and the New York City Community Land Initiative, so I cannot honestly be accused of being lazy, feckless, or not working, even though I remain unpaid and cannot afford to move out of a homeless shelter, even if I did do work that is abnormally excruciatingly painful for me. There are yahoos out there who think I should be forced to “contribute” in such a manner. In Germany, it’s illegal to fly the flag that represents their beliefs.

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Real Affordability for All, Where “All” Means 10% of the U.S. Population

I learned from Lynn Lewis, director of Picture the Homeless, that the “Real Affordability for All” coalition was unhappy that members of Picture the Homeless, such as myself, were shouting things like “Define affordable!” and “Income-targeted housing” at a press conference at City Hall a few months back. Lynn said that she doesn’t share their concern and did not disapprove of my actions. RAFA ignored all PTH recommendations the one time when PTH was brought to the table. In the room at the time I was told this were two Picture the Homeless staffers, another member of Picture the Homeless who is also living in a shelter in spite of a master’s degree, a staff member of an elected official, and a CUNY professor, who went to a more recent RAFA rally in Harlem. I don’t know about the staffers, one of them too young to have finished college, but everyone else in the room holds a master’s degree or higher, and the professor said that the only reason he could afford to live in RAFA’s idea of “affordable housing,” which is the same as Andrew Cuomo’s, is by virtue that his wife is a physician.

Why does Real Affordability for All fight for housing that is affordable to people who have physician’s incomes? If more people understood that that is what “Affordable” means based on federal definitions, RAFA would get no support. They don’t like that the fact that the one time they invited PTH to the table, that PTH members have refused to endorse anything they’ve done because RAFA has refused to strike “temporary” from their housing subsidy requests on the grounds that it’s “winnable.” Picture the Homeless’s position has consistently been that temporary rental subsidies don’t work. Maria Walles (who needs special thanks, because she is the one who actually made the ask before Gilbert Taylor and the Department of Homeless services to give people more than a day’s notice of shelter transfer–she was very pleased to find out that I had gotten such) had the Work Advantage subsidy, and her family is back in a shelter because the jobs she and her husband had were not enough to pay rent on their own, and thus, were a revolving door back into the shelter system. That seems to be their approach when it comes to so-called “affordable housing,” which is catering toward the middle class, which is now down to only 10% of the U.S. population. Based on Cuomo’s definitions, two homeless people with master’s degrees, a staff member of an elected official (with a master’s degree), and a college professor (with a Ph.D.), do not qualify as middle class, but the physician does. The definition of affordable housing is based on the Area Median Income (AMI) which was invented by Andrew Cuomo when he was director of Housing and Urban Development at the federal level. The area median income for a family of four for the New York City area is $80,000, while the average income of a family of four in Manhattan is $53,000. When the government says “affordable housing,” 90% of it is affordable to people making $60,000 or more, which excludes highly educated people in respectable positions, or qualified for respectable positions. (The other homeless person with a master’s degree at the table was Arvernetta Henry, a retired schoolteacher, while yesterday, I was interviewed for a $25 an hour position as a copywriter for CBS (Columbia Broadcasting System).) Affordable housing is not built for people like us because Cuomo intentionally skewed the averages by including Rockland and Westchester Counties, while those counties get exemptions from being figured into their affordable housing, yet they still impact us for some perverse reason. Most people who consider themselves “middle class” are really “moderate income” by official definitions, while “middle class” is defined as people making above $120,000 a year, a figure most of us would consider to be “upper class” and not even “upper middle class.”

Those of you in New York, please vote for Zephyr Teachout in the primary election. She is the only one with enough of a base to defeat Cuomo in the primary election. If you vote for Cuomo, the lame duck will unquestionably remove bans from fracking and make sure there is no housing that anyone making below a physician’s income can afford. A vote for Cuomo is a vote for hydrofracking, so as far as I’m concerned, if you care about these things, and you vote for Cuomo in either the primary or general election, you are part of the problem and have waived your right to complain. If Zephyr Teachout does not win the Democratic primary, I will be voting for Howie Hawkins (Green Party) in the fall. I may be homeless, but I am a registered voter, and the Board of Elections has my new address–I got my transfer notice last week and I vote. The only year I didn’t vote since becoming old enough was 2003, and only because I had been in the city only two months and didn’t know enough about local politics to vote in any particular way.

Laundry Update

The laundry wasn’t so bad.  I was able to fit about 3/4 of my laundry bag full of underwear and socks into the pillowcase, and they didn’t turn out too badly.  The worst thing that happened was that when the security guard took me to get my laundry, he let me stay upstairs when he saw my cane and bags, and brought up the wrong bag with the right number.  I went down and saw why they don’t have people going down there.  The ceiling is so low that they’d be opening themselves to liability lawsuits, and you have to keep stepping over and ducking under pipes to get to the laundry room. As bad as the setup is, if they made the area public, someone would surely get hurt.  I don’t think signage would be adequate to make it OK. I guess I can put down my outerwear on Tuesday, especially since I have an interview that day and will be wearing a suit rather than my black jeans.

The bedrooms at the shelter are a very dark tan, darker than coffee ice cream but like coffee mildly creamed.  My sheets are a lighter tan than that (they provided them, but that isn’t typical), so it was easy to find it.  I pulled it out and showed that mine had tag #4, just like I said.  For some reason, they had more than one tag #4 in the security booth.

I hope this will be my last shelter, even though it’s a step up from the others.  As long as I don’t get written up for my medication or my non-appearance at the “mandatory” relapse prevention meetings and so forth, my only major complaint that I haven’t noted here is my bed itself, which is like lying on a mesh of springs wrapped in vinyl, even though, unlike at my other shelters, there is actually a box spring below it.

The shelter is a bit more welcoming t the entrance than some others–the walls are cool blue and it smells like a bowling alley.  The handbook even says that visitors are encouraged in the common areas during the day.  We are not forced to leave the building, although this reduces the meal windows to an hour, so I’ve yet to have any meal at the shelter other than breakfast at the shelter, and my SNAP benefits, which replenish on the 8th, are nearly gone (I think I have about $10 left as I write this).  I’m also conserving Metrocards, since my 30-day unlimited ran out yesterday, and I don’t have any money for another one other than drawing off my savings, which is down to just over $1,100 because I had to pay for my storage last month.  I’m glad I checked at the Apple Store before going to see The Winter’s Tale at Riverside Park, since it closed last weekend.  Daniela Robles (my contact at MFY Legal said that I could name her as long as I don’t post her direct line or e-mail address, a courtesy I don’t give to people who are clearly not on my side) told me that the HRA worker was wrong for not submitting my storage request.  HRA found that I was eligible and restored my lost benefits, but without the paperwork that I had filed a request (I did present the residency letter and receipt to the worker), they refused to reimburse me for my August storage.  Ms. Robles said that next time I should insist that they do so (my arrest last year inhibited me), ask to see a supervisor if they refuse, and call her if the supervisor refuses, because they are required by law to at least accept the request under their formal procedures.  This is why I say that DHS owes me, because it was the lies of DHS employees Angelica Jiménez and Natalya Castro that caused my public assistance case to be closed and make it necessary to draw off my savings to pay for storage.

It’s nothing but pure cronyism that the government is willing to pay $3,773.75 each month to keep me in the system and pay for my storage, when keeping me in my apartment at $1,018.75, or whatever the Rent Guidelines Board allowed the landlord to jack it up to, would be so much less expensive, and more conducive to me working.  Since so many jobs in my skill set require telecommuting, needing a third party for computer access is a serious barrier to employment.  They act like they’re helping me when they make me sit through a recruitment session at which 100% of the jobs require constant standing and often heavy lifting, things they have on file that I can’t be doing for extended periods of time.  No rational, reasonable person would consider that “help,” nor is it “job development” to have someone look up jobs for me on Google and Craigslist as though I’m not capable of doing that myself, nor willing to do that myself.  To be a job developer is to have connections, and when job developers don’t have these, they are getting paid for what I do for free.

Competence and Employment Are Unrelated

dumbresidencyletter-page-001

 The Orthodox Jew used to call Ivette Carasquillo “Turdette” before she got transferred to NAICA’s Anthony Avenue annex.  The woman who took over her seat (I never got her name, and I’m no longer there) is obviously more competent than me because she is employed, at least according to dumb right-wingers.  To them, “To whom it my concern” is an appropriate introduction, and “This letter is to whom the Bronx  Park Ave Men Shelter, that Scott Hutchins resides at Bronx Park av Shelter,” is a more coherent sentence than anything ever written on my blog, and that a resident signature rather than a case manager’s signature is the appropriate way to send a residency letter.  Needless to say, I asked someone else to do it because I knew that there was no way that HRA would accept the above letter of residency.  But of course, this gargantuanly obese woman is more qualified for her job than I am.

ElizabethandMe

The woman in the above photo is no longer my friend.  She has been holding a grudge against me for more than four years because she alleges that I have been interfering with her and her late mother’s IMDb pages against her wishes.  The reality is that I did nothing with either page after she asked me not to do so.  I got a very angry letter from her on LinkedIn, which I thought about posting here to shame her, but I still consider her my friend even if she doesn’t consider me so.  It’s very sad that she blames me for IMDb being notoriously difficult with which to work (of course, she is not having employment issues).  Numerous celebrities have had fights with IMDb about wanting their credits removed from certain films, attempting to take ownership of their “resume,” whereas IMDb is a complete database, and does offer resume services to IMDb Pro customers, although it doesn’t affect their databases.

The main reason that I post this picture is because some of my Twitter cyberbullies found it and started saying that I either don’t brush my teeth or don’t know how to brush my teeth, and this is a rare photo of me in which my smile shows my teeth.  Because of their appearance, I prefer to do closed-moth smiles in pictures.  I encountered a crazy old man at a soup kitchen months ago who kept telling me to brush my teeth, and it didn’t get a rise out of me, because it was easier to dismiss him as an idiot than someone online.  I was reminded of this when a 7 year-old in our party at the Eric Garner rally kept telling me that the yellow would go away if I simply brushed my teeth.  Given that this was a seven year-old, I had no difficulty emotionally when I could not get through to her that this simply will not work in my case.  Any interviewer who declined to hire me based on this belief, however, is far more at fault for my homelessness than I am, since the basis of their opinion is completely false, invalidating such an opinion, or they’re just plutocrats who judge me for not having funds, perpetuating a cycle of lack of funds for me.

My mother says that I lied about the tetracycline on a previous blog entry.  That was a guess made by Richard Kang, M.D., whose specialty is pain management, and considered plausible by Uche Akwuba, D.O., my former primary care doctor (he is no longer working for Montefiore, but set up a private practice without telling the clinic where, which is why I’m now at St. Barnabas).  I do not know if penicillin, which my mother says is the medication I took for an ear infection when I was a toddler,   is capable of doing this in allergic people.  I learned of my penicillin allergy when I was about 14 and was prescribed a derivative called Amoxicillin for an early stage of pneumonia.  When it gave me hives, I was switched to erythromycin.  Nevertheless, no dentist thinks that yellow is ever coming off, and I’ve seen several since coming to New York.  (I lost count because I’m currently seen at St. Barnabas Hospital’s dental department, and their dentists graduate).  I was supposed to get composite material put on the yellow stains a few weeks ago, but they really needed me to buy whitening strips to attempt to lighten the area around it and make for an easier match, but because a box of whitening strips cost 7/8 of a current month’s income right now, I can’t do it.

I have a woman friend who tells me that I am unusually handsome, and that that is why my teeth are so off-putting, because it looks like a mismatch.  She compared me with a current British TV star, Ed Gamble from Almost Royal, although I think he looks more like John Linnell or Dave Foley.  She also told me that her husband did commercial work when he was younger, but his teeth kept him in “working class” roles, like a guy buying a wedding ring at Sears.  Their senior photos are on the mantle, so it’s not hard to imagine him in such a role.  I tried to find the commercial on YouTube, but I couldn’t find it.

Of course, I would understand it if I were going for acting gigs, but I haven’t done so.  She says that my teeth conflict with the  white collar image and keeps me out of those jobs too, so thanks, Mom and Dad, for those braces that everyone said that I needed but you.  A right-wing nutjob made a circular argument (I would call it ridiculous, but that would be redundant) about how I need to invest thousands of dollars I don’t have on my teeth in order to get the job, and when I asked where I was supposed to get the money, he said by getting the job that I need my teeth fixed to do.  Right-wingers specialize in circular arguments, which are inherently illogical.  They keep accusing me of putting words into their mouths, which I do when it is logical to do so, most often with the transactional axiom of equality, which they seem to be too stupid to understand.  That’s the one that says if a=b and b=c, therefore a=c.  They keep insisting that a≠c and calling me a liar for saying that it does, even if they’ll admit that a=b and b=c.  They all think that they are more intelligent than me because they are employed, but they can’t even follow a logical argument.

Confusing Paul Jardine

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NAME of FIELDS

DATA

Message Type: Complaint
Topic: Other
Contact Info: Yes
M/M: Mr.
First Name: Scott
Middle Name: A
Last Name: Hutchins
Company: The Bowery Mission Transitional Center
Street Address: 45-51 Avenue D
Address Number: 306
City: New York
State: NY
Country: United States
Work Phone #: 10009
Email Address: scottandrewhutchins@yahoo.com
Message: Paul Jardine probably will not be able to understand this because of his limited reading comprehension skills, but I object to this shelters laundry policy. They wash whatever we can fit into a pillowcase. I should be in a shelter at which I can do as much laundry as I see fit without paying. I did not see fit to complain until HRA incompetence and laziness cost me the job that I was supposed to start this morning. Of course, because we have private rooms here, I do not wish to change shelters. I just want to be able to do my laundry thoroughly and efficiently without drawing off my 45 a month in public assistance, which I need for transportation. At Bellevue, Eddie Harris, and Bronx Park Ave, we did it ourselves for free. The only reason I didnt complain about Third Streets 10 garment full service policy is because I was on unemployment at the time and could afford to take it to the laundromat.

Paul Jardine probably will not be able to understand this because of his limited reading comprehension skills, but I object to this shelter’s laundry policy. They wash whatever we can fit into a pillowcase. I should be in a shelter at which I can do as much laundry as I see fit without paying. I did not see fit to complain until HRA incompetence and laziness cost me the job that I was supposed to start this morning. Of course, because we have private rooms here, I do not wish to change shelters. I just want to be able to do my laundry thoroughly and efficiently without drawing off my $45 a month in public assistance, which I need for transportation. At Bellevue, Eddie Harris, and Bronx Park Ave, we did it ourselves for free. The only reason I didn’t complain about Third Street’s 10 garment full service policy is because I was on unemployment at the time and could afford to take it to the laundromat.

A System Set Up for Us to Fail

The one problem with starting my new position on August 11 was the BEV review, without which, I could not continue to receive Medicaid, as the job does not provide benefits, and, for example, Oxybutynin ER costs $189 out of pocket (not to be confused with Oxybutynin, which Target sells for $5, and doesn’t work on me in any dosage).   I called the rescheduling line (718-254-0400), and they said that they could postpone the BEV review, but not allow me to have it earlier.  I was given another line to call (718-752-7001), but the woman who answered said that she couldn’t help either.  She gave me the lines for Ms. Espinal (718-784-6900), and her supervisor, Thomas Lucas (718-752-7979).  I left a voice mail with the former.  I got the latter on the line, and he asked me for the 718-752-7001 number and then told me to call him back in twenty minutes.  Twenty minutes later, I called him, and he said, in a very condescending voice, “I don’t reschedule appointments. Thank you. Goodbye,” and hung up before I could get another word in.  When I was at HRA to turn in documentation, the receptionist told me that I could not reschedule the appointment earlier.  The worker to whom I turned in the documentation spoke to someone there, and got the same response.  She said that she wasn’t going to send me to the fourth floor without Mr. Lucas’s OK, and that it was extremely important to make my appointment on Monday.

I called my contact at the staffing service and said that there was no way to reschedule this appointment, because seven HRA workers had said that it could not be done, including the supervisor.  My contact at MFY Legal Services, whose specialty is benefits, said that the reality is that their software does not allow them to move the appointment earlier.  I finally got the OK to start Tuesday at 11:44 AM Friday, but then at 3:50 this afternoon got notice that the position had been canceled.  I believe I lost the job because Thomas Lucas is too lazy and unprofessional to do his job properly, and will continue to believe so unless something other than the move of my start date to Tuesday is the cause of the end of the position. Thus, I have another piece of evidence that my homelessness is entirely the fault of others.

Today, I also received notice that I was past due on my student loan payment.  When I logged in, I discovered that no one had bothered to tell me that my July 8 unemployment deferment had been denied because I am no longer receiving unemployment benefits, so I had to submit an economic hardship deferment instead.

This reminds me of the Rutgers situation I learned about from Occupy meetings.  A married couple of professors at the highest non-managerial pay rate at Rutgers have too much student loan debt to live in the middle class part of town, so the university hires professors from Europe and Asia, whose educations were paid for entirely by their home country’s government. They don’t want to have their professors living in lower class neighborhoods, and instead of paying more, they simply look elsewhere for their hires.

If the United States government wasn’t too busy kowtowing to the wealthy crybabies who fund them instead of doing the will of the people whom they supposedly represent, all student loan debts would be paid by the government, and all education going forward would be paid by the government the way it is done in social democracies such as Germany, Japan, and India. At the very least, they need to repeal the unconstitutional law that prevents discharge of student loans in bankruptcy.  The link in the previous sentence links to my commentary on Moe Tkacik’s Reuters article exposing this unconstitutionality. She (Moe is short for Maureen) and I met at an Occupy meeting in early January. I asked for permission to quote some things from her e-mail to me, but she never responded to give me consent, so I never did so. She said in person that she thinks that the reasons I can’t find a job is because employers today want employees who are malleable, sycophantic, and shallow, and that these traits are impossible to fake. I never thought of, nor was I raised to believe, that being sycophantic or shallow as positive traits, and I don’t think that I’m not malleable. She gave up her journalism job (top paid at her firm and a name journalist in the D.C. area) because working at a restaurant paid her more. Until she learned of my leg and foot neuropathy, she thought that I should get a job at a French restaurant since I speak French rather than Spanish, which is pretty much essential these days for any restaurant job. She said that I was essentially fucked because these jobs are impractical in my condition. I looked up success rate for Lyrica and Gabapentin, and it turns out it’s only around 60%, which means I’m not exactly weird for these medications not improving my condition. I guess the one good thing about not having this job is that I can go to physical therapy, although the physical therapy I received in 2005-6 did absolutely nothing to improve my condition–only chiropractic did that.

What we have is someone with connections whose only job is to sit back and get a paycheck because he has connections (Lucas’s LinkedIn profile mentions he was in a rotary club in Houston prior to becoming a supervisor at HRA) choosing not to work and costing me a job. This is a clear-cut case of why my homelessness is a systemic issue based upon the choices of the rich.

https://play.spotify.com/trackset/mediabar/4d7VkLjE7tRSckrHWp6IEL%2C1Q0oMV3ttfgXcH3TsKLJtE%2C55iep2nfMdAo2FHabohTl7%2C4d4QN1gUswaQP8ZhPgjeP8%2C0mUjtmt7743AaO94SajjPB%2C5BpyGmXnyEoADauIC9ZFRh%2C2uVf0GK5oVAlhMpWl8DTj7/%23/0

Transferred to The Bowery Mission

The Bowery Mission shelter at 45-51 Avenue D isn’t too bad since you get your own room–14 men on a floor, although it’s a half hour walk to the nearest subway station. At least the bus comes once every few minutes through most parts of the day and week. The room is only slightly larger than my area at previous shelters, but at least it’s private. There is a lot of B.S. in the handbook involving preparing people for food service and maintenance jobs, but I will presumably be exempt from these between my medical documentation and my employment status. They don’t give bag lunches unless you are working, so I’ll be going kind of hungry until Monday. Still, I immediately had two extremely valid complaints for the commissioner of DHS:

Thank You For Filling Out This Form

Shown below is your submission to NYC.gov on Tuesday, August 5, 2014 at 11:03:08

This form resides at http://www.nyc.gov/html/mail/html/maildhs.html


 

NAME of FIELDS

 

DATA

 

Message Type: Complaint
Topic: Other
Contact Info: Yes
M/M: Mr.
First Name: Scott
Middle Name: A
Last Name: Hutchins
Company: Bowery Mission
Street Address: 45-51 Avenue D
Address Number: 306
City: New York
State: NY
Postal Code: 10009
Country: United States
Work Phone #:
Email Address: scottandrewhutchins@yahoo.com
Message: (1/2) There are signs all over the shelter, even in the elevator, demanding surrender of prescription medication to the operations manager. This is an illegal and unconstitutional breach of privacy, and the shelter should not have a right to kick out tenants based on non-compliance with this rule. In my case, I will simply forget to take my medicine if I dont have it in my room.

(1/2) There are signs all over the shelter, even in the elevator, demanding surrender of prescription medication to the operations manager. This is an illegal and unconstitutional breach of privacy, and the shelter should not have a right to kick out tenants based on non-compliance with this rule. In my case, I will simply forget to take my medicine if I dont have it in my room.

 

Thank You For Filling Out This Form

Shown below is your submission to NYC.gov on Tuesday, August 5, 2014 at 11:17:59

This form resides at http://www.nyc.gov/html/mail/html/maildhs.html


 

NAME of FIELDS

 

DATA

 

Message Type: Complaint
Topic: Other
Contact Info: Yes
M/M: Mr.
First Name: Scott
Middle Name: A
Last Name: Hutchins
Company: The Bowery Mission
Street Address: 45-51 Avenue D
Address Number: 306
City: New York
State: NY
Postal Code: 10009
Country: United States
Work Phone #:
Email Address: scottandrewhutchins@yahoo.com
Message: (2/2) The shelter can show the Callahan inspectors that there are three showers on the sleeping floor (I dont know if they all work), but the reality is that two of them are kept locked at all time. Beginning Monday, April 11, I will be starting a new job at which I need to report at 8:30 AM. If I am late to my job and lose it as a result of lack of access to a shower, the shelter can expect a 32,000 lawsuit–roughly a years salary. The building is not air conditioned (nor are we allowed to put one in), and an air conditioner just outside my window in the facing building increases the heat in my room, making showering in the evening not particularly useful. Please enforce the opening of the other showers.

 

Use the link to return to the Form

 

(2/2)  The shelter can show the Callahan inspectors that there are three showers on the sleeping floor (I dont know if they all work), but the reality is that two of them are kept locked at all time. Beginning Monday, April 11, I will be starting a new job at which I need to report at 8:30 AM. If I am late to my job and lose it as a result of lack of access to a shower, the shelter can expect a 32,000 lawsuit–roughly a years salary. The building is not air conditioned (nor are we allowed to put one in), and an air conditioner just outside my window in the facing building increases the heat in my room, making showering in the evening not particularly useful. Please enforce the opening of the other showers.

 

(The NYC.gov system cannot handle apostrophes, quotation marks, dollar signs, and I don’t know what other characters.)

 

Before the guards at Bronx Park Avenue  got lax and didn’t call out my prescription medicine, I didn’t forget to take my medication most of the time, but I did sometimes, and that is my point.

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