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Forced to Wear Dirty Socks

March 31, 2014

Because of the stupidity of the staff at NAICA Bronx Park Avenue, I have to spend money to clean my socks when I have no income.  Because there were five weekends in March 2014, I have clothes enough for biweekly washing, and the people who run the shelter top the card off at ten dollars on only the first six days of each month–they claim that this is a product of the programming of the machine that loads it (they also say one has to be in full compliance to get the laundry card reloaded, so in other words, comply or stink), I am stuck without.  I was able to wash my whites this weekend, but not the colors, since only $1.00 remains on my card.  The wash costs $2.00, and 50¢ for each cycle of drying.  All of my options are expensive and time consuming other than wearing dirty socks.  I am used to wearing my outer clothing multiple times before washing them, but not my socks, which are all black to match my black shoes.

 

My options:

#1: Take my color load to the laundromat.  I am pretty busy this week, and I would have to time it well to make it back by curfew.  This is probably the least expensive option.

#2: If I pull cash out of the bank, I may be able to buy a package of black tube socks (fit is a big issue, and black tube socks are hard to find), but he may or may not have them when I have the cash on me, and I don’t know how much he charges.

#3: I can spend $8.50 to get more socks out of storage.  I know I have additional pairs there.

Another problem with #2 and #3 is the issue of space in my suitcase.  It’s jam-packed now and many more garments will likely break the zippers if I pack it any further.  My previous suitcase was somewhat larger, and its zippers are broken.  I had to leave a lot of dress shirts in there.  It is currently in a friend’s garage.  I could place it in another part of my locker, but that opens up all sorts of other issues of storage and making sure I don’t have excessive belongings in my locker if I’m given a sudden transfer.

It’s patently disgusting that an operation making $118 a day in tax money off my presence won’t let me wash my clothes in a timely manner.  It’s an example of how privatizing public services is rife with abuse.  The staff don’t care about helping you.  Their job should be to put themselves out of a job, but they behave as though their job is to ensure that they continue to have a job.

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7 Comments
  1. Blinguini permalink

    Hey, don’t sweat it, bro. I wears ma socks mo dan once widout washin’ dem even dough ah’ have some honky chick t’wash dem fo’ me. It’s all cool, slap mah fro. No one be the wiser.

  2. Janice Flahiff permalink

    Thank you. I volunteer at a clothing center for people with low/no income. We know folks around the center have little/no money for laundromats. They can only get two pairs socks every 3 months. Often wonder how they get by…..
    Well, as I ‘ve heard..now that I know about this…what am I going to do…

  3. Jak permalink

    Man, it just sucks that you have to deal with all this. People aren’t aware how poverty can grind you down. Life is a lot easier when you don’t have to worry about this stuff. Good luck to you, I hope things get better soon.

  4. bwahahahahaha

    lazy thug complains about being unemployed by calling for others to be unemployed who provide services to the community bwahahahahahahahahahahaha

    thanks for the laugh

    • If you think I am a lazy thug, you are functionally illiterate. If you think those I think should be unemployed do good service, you are a fool.

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